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About Varied / Hobbyist Member Cheryn RappFemale/Hungary Recent Activity
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Source:  Frontispiece of the “Heironymus Corvina” (1488; Florence, Italy), consisting of St. Jerome’s commentaries on the epistles of St. Paul.   


    This book was commissioned by Matthias Corvina, King of Hungary from 1458-1490, for his royal library in the city of Buda.  Like most of the books he collected (now referred to as “corvinas”), this one was commissioned from the great illuminators of Florence.  This particular book was illuminated in 1488 by Gherardo and Monte di Giovanni, two brothers at the head of a very prominent atelier in renaissance Italy that produced multiple books for the Hungarian royal library.  



Materials:

  • Pergamenata (regular weight, natural)

  • 23 karat gold leaf

  • fish glue diluted with water

  • Windsor-Newton gouaches

  • Louvre acrylics (deep red background)

  • Enere Sennelier Or 03 Gold Ink



Design:

I chose this piece to work from for several reasons - for one thing, I wanted to make a scroll for my apprentice-sister based on one of the manuscripts from King Matthias’s library, as it is a current research topic of mine, and she and I even got to see one of the original manuscripts in person (though not this particular one), thanks to a very friendly library curator!

This piece was perfect to do for aforementioned apprenti-seester (aka Letia, LetiaPants, Letia Thistle-butt, etc), because of the lovely sprays of thistles on the top, bottom, and sides.  It also had a lot of lovely floral and fruit elements of the type we like to collectively squee over.  

I kept most of the elements the same without changing them because they were so fitting on their own, but I did change the color of the belts buckled around the central wreathes to be green instead of pink/red.  Firstly, Letia is my apprenti-seester and we have green belts.  Secondly, the idea of painting red stripes on green belts was farrr too amusing - Letia’s green apprentice belt actually does have red stripes on it (in the manner of a karate belt), due to the fact that she did indeed Smack Our Laurel In The Face.  The stripes are a warning for other wayward apprentices not to get their belt colors confused and accidentally think they are squires.  Eep.



Latin Text & Translation:

Why Latin?  Because Latin just looks fancier!  And it’s period!  And soooo totally renaissance Italy!  This text was translated by Yusuf bin Abdullah (Thomas Bensing), and can be rendered into English as:


“We heard that you like to bear arms

so we augmented your arms

so that when you bear your arms

they can be augmented

by augmentations.

It’s done!”



...because we are silly, silly people.




Bibliography:

St. Jerome; “Heironymus Covina” / Commentarii in epistolas S. Pauli;  National Szechenyi Library, Budapest, Hungary.


Miko, Arpad; The Corvinas of King Matthias in the National Szechenyi Library; 2008 Kossuth Publishing; Budapest, Hungary.
Letia's Augmentation of Arms by Merwenna
Letia's Augmentation of Arms
This is a for-the-lols award that I made for my seester-apprenti, Letia Thistlethueyt, based on the frontispiece of the “Heironymus Corvina” (1488; Florence, Italy), consisting of St. Jerome’s commentaries on the epistles of St. Paul.  This copy was commissioned by Matthias Corvinus of Hungary, and it was illuminated in 1488 by Gherardo and Monte di Giovanni, two brothers at the head of a very prominent atelier in renaissance Italy that produced multiple books for the Hungarian royal library.  

I really wanted to do this one for Letia because 1) It's covered in thistles, and 2) she and I got to see one of the corvina manuscripts together IN PERSON and it was AMAZING.

Materials used: 
Pergamenata (regular weight, natural), 23 karat gold leaf, fish glue diluted with water, Windsor-Newton gouaches, Louvre acrylics (deep red background), Enere Sennelier Or 03 Gold Ink.
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Merwenna
Cheryn Rapp
Artist | Hobbyist | Varied
Hungary
Hello, I'm Cheryn (also known as Merwenna)! I do a lot of calligraphy and illumination-related art, especially for the Society for Creative Anachronism to be used as awards - most of what you see in my gallery are award "scrolls".

Several of my pieces are done with historically accurate ground pigments and animal skin parchment, though I most frequently use gouache on pergamenata. I also enjoy combining medieval aesthetics with modern subjects just for kicks! I've dipped my toe into bookbinding and panel painting, I enjoy painting unexpected accessory items like parasols and wooden chests every now and again, and I am currently learning more about paleography and manuscript conservation.

I'm from the US but am currently living in Budapest - also trying (and failing) to learn Hungarian! I do take commissions, so don't hesitate to contact me with any questions. :)
Interests


Source:  Frontispiece of the “Heironymus Corvina” (1488; Florence, Italy), consisting of St. Jerome’s commentaries on the epistles of St. Paul.   


    This book was commissioned by Matthias Corvina, King of Hungary from 1458-1490, for his royal library in the city of Buda.  Like most of the books he collected (now referred to as “corvinas”), this one was commissioned from the great illuminators of Florence.  This particular book was illuminated in 1488 by Gherardo and Monte di Giovanni, two brothers at the head of a very prominent atelier in renaissance Italy that produced multiple books for the Hungarian royal library.  



Materials:

  • Pergamenata (regular weight, natural)

  • 23 karat gold leaf

  • fish glue diluted with water

  • Windsor-Newton gouaches

  • Louvre acrylics (deep red background)

  • Enere Sennelier Or 03 Gold Ink



Design:

I chose this piece to work from for several reasons - for one thing, I wanted to make a scroll for my apprentice-sister based on one of the manuscripts from King Matthias’s library, as it is a current research topic of mine, and she and I even got to see one of the original manuscripts in person (though not this particular one), thanks to a very friendly library curator!

This piece was perfect to do for aforementioned apprenti-seester (aka Letia, LetiaPants, Letia Thistle-butt, etc), because of the lovely sprays of thistles on the top, bottom, and sides.  It also had a lot of lovely floral and fruit elements of the type we like to collectively squee over.  

I kept most of the elements the same without changing them because they were so fitting on their own, but I did change the color of the belts buckled around the central wreathes to be green instead of pink/red.  Firstly, Letia is my apprenti-seester and we have green belts.  Secondly, the idea of painting red stripes on green belts was farrr too amusing - Letia’s green apprentice belt actually does have red stripes on it (in the manner of a karate belt), due to the fact that she did indeed Smack Our Laurel In The Face.  The stripes are a warning for other wayward apprentices not to get their belt colors confused and accidentally think they are squires.  Eep.



Latin Text & Translation:

Why Latin?  Because Latin just looks fancier!  And it’s period!  And soooo totally renaissance Italy!  This text was translated by Yusuf bin Abdullah (Thomas Bensing), and can be rendered into English as:


“We heard that you like to bear arms

so we augmented your arms

so that when you bear your arms

they can be augmented

by augmentations.

It’s done!”



...because we are silly, silly people.




Bibliography:

St. Jerome; “Heironymus Covina” / Commentarii in epistolas S. Pauli;  National Szechenyi Library, Budapest, Hungary.


Miko, Arpad; The Corvinas of King Matthias in the National Szechenyi Library; 2008 Kossuth Publishing; Budapest, Hungary.

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:iconcalligraphyartworks:
calligraphyartworks Featured By Owner 6 days ago  New member Student Traditional Artist
Thank you for the favs,and watching!!!
Reply
:iconsindeon:
Sindeon Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2015
In the name of Sindeon I thank you for the fav and also for the following of our facebook page! Good news: we decided that from February, we will upload every content in Hungarian as well as in English :) So thanks for following us - if you want to join any of our program, you are more than welcome. 
Reply
:iconmerwenna:
Merwenna Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you!  I actually am living in Budapest for part of this year, though I am an American and my Hungarian is very bad right now (I'm trying to learn!)  I would love to help out once I am back in Hungary!  
Reply
:iconsindeon:
Sindeon Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2015
You are more than welcome! If you are interested, contact me in person: www.facebook.com/szilvia.petka

I will really start working on translation, but I just wrote a little description about grown-ups participation possibilities in Sindeon for someone, here it goes: 

Sindeon is mainly a children's camp. The kids come for 2 weeks (pay ~200 EUR), and this includes everything: lodging in houses (4-8 person rooms, indoor toilets and showers, etc, so no camping), food (we have 2 people cooking for us, 3 times a day + snacks, icecream, fruits, etc. They make reaaally good food, like fire-made hamburger, soups, goulash in kettle, not cheap stuff). We have a truck-load of things: hundreds of costumes, about 40-50 armors, lots of weapons, tents, accessories. The participants can choose their own basic starter gear from this, and everything else that gives advantage (weapon, etc.) has to be obtained through the game. For example, if you want to have a good sword, you have to find a smith to make one for you, steal from someone, buy from a merchant, etc. Its a big difference from typical larps: here you can steal from someone, since it is not their own gear, but everyone's. When your character dies, and you make a new character, you have to start again, your new character can not inherit from your dead one. 
Examples for costumes: if you join a noble house, they will provide you their own tabard, representing that you belong to them. Or if you become part of the royal guard, the king provides you the armor. 

The idea for the grown-up weekend was that anyone can join for 2-3 days (most people cannot take 2 weeks off from work), and the price is the same for them, ~16 EUR/day. 

We also have a system for grown-ups who want to join as helpers for 2 weeks: they pay half price (so ~100 EUR for 2 weeks), but help us in all kind of things (giving out the food for the kids, packing the costumes, being NPC's, etc). 
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:iconmdlillustration:
mdlillustration Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2015  Professional General Artist
I am in complete awe of your calligraphy and illuminations!I think I've fainted. 
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:iconmerwenna:
Merwenna Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you!  Your work is GORGEOUS!  :D
Reply
:iconmdlillustration:
mdlillustration Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015  Professional General Artist
Beaming with pride now. Thank you for the watchback as well :)
Reply
:icondeluxior:
deluxior Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2014  Professional General Artist
Thanks for the visit!)
Reply
:iconcalligraphism:
Calligraphism Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you for WATCHing me! 
Reply
:iconthecalligraphyguy:
TheCalligraphyGuy Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2014
Thanks for the watch!
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